Skip to main content

About your Search

20121001
20121009
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5
about emotional, financial, social, spiritual and environments, occupational and intellectual as well as physical aspects of ourselves. we call this the eighth dimension model of wellness. this is how we conceptualize wellness. we care about physical wellness because people are physically sick and many are dying 25 years before the general population. we care about intellectual wellness because we need healthy minds and healthy bodies in the knowledge to reclaim and manage our lives in recovery. we care about social wellness because the conditions bring about social isolation, leading people further from their healthy recovery. we care about spiritual wellness because disease, all these diseases, robs us of our sense of meaning, purpose and spiritual connectedness. we care about mental and emotional wellness week as people need clear, wide lines in order to live productive lives and pursue recovery. we care about environmental wellness because it's impossible for people to feel better or well in places or spaces where there is overcrowding, stress, pollution and other toxins in both p
compromise with the enemy. it is not going to happen. it is a terrible environment for the big deal that needs to get done. so acknowledge the reality. let's do the deal in 2013 but let's not cause a recession. basically just extend current policy to the extent policy and hope we get 2013 intact. that is my goal. >> doug, let me throw out a theory to get your reaction. the theory is this. that as long as the discussion about tax reform is an ongoing argument about the bush tax cuts -- >> i'm so tired of the bush tax cuts i can barely stand it. >> i think most people would agree. >> they have been talked about for 10 years? can we talk about something else? >> that is exactly the point. as long as you have extended the bush tax cuts, as donald said, only half of this is about the bush tax cuts. >> right. >> but in the public discussion it is the bush tax cuts. so as long as you extend them, can you get out of that debate? conversely if you let them all go. >>, does that change the framing of this we're no longer talking about the bush tax cuts, we're just talking about the tax code a
and education. and also making environment where it's easy enough for businesses to hire people and employ people and kind of stay out of everybody's way. >> host: how is it doing on those? >> caller: i don't think it's doing really well when the minimum wage is sitting at $10 an hour in some states. it's not there yet but it's getting very quick. and that isn't enough to employ people some people like myself, a small businessman, it's hard for me to employ more people when i'm having to pay so much for everything. the price of everything is going up, the price of fuel, the price of electricity, the price of food, the price of everything is going up right now. so i don't think the government is doing a good job. >> host: thanks in washington. "the wall street journal" this morning another comparison between the two candidates is and so much on the role of government, the definition of patriotism. president barack obama says he wants the new economic patriotism that mitt romney calls the presidential campaign a battle for the soul of america. the candidates are not only racing to win an ele
's an understatement. but you go up and in environment, at least i was fortunately enough to where we believe that it was perfectible. you know, it's very, i think, pretty much acceptable or maybe somewhat today to be critical or almost invariably critical of the country and pointing out what is wrong. there are obviously things wrong. there were obviously things wrong when i grew up in georgia, and that was pointed out. but it was always this unrelying -- underlying bailiff belief we were entitled -- it was the way we grew up. the nones who were immigrants who would explain it to us we were entitled as citizens of the country to be full participates. there was never any doubt that we were inherently equal. it said so in the decoration of independents. there were times later on -- make remarks reciting the not so pleasant remarks and reciting the pledge of allee again or say things i think were -- not be cell phones. [laughter] people can youtube and you it's around forever. i was upset about thing. but i grew up in an environment with people around me who believed that this country could be
environment, you know, fill in the blank. now, again, this is something that we could debate about at great length, but i assume that if you like federalism defined as some degree of subnational autonomy where people can make decisions rell thetively free -- relatively free of national override, then our constitution does a dreadful job in protecting local autonomy. you might, on the other hand, believe in some areas we have too much local autonomy as a political matter and would want to address that in a constitution. you mentioned cities that are very interesting. texas is six times as large as the entire united states population in 1790. we in austin especially are familiar with the tyranny of a centralized government in austin itself called the state government that often seems determined to deprive the city of austin of autonomy over matters that we hold near and dear. so i think that to the extent that federalism does stand for a principle of decision making at subnational levels and allowing people to participate if decisions that effect their lives, then any modern constitutional co
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5